Michael Fraker

Role

Research Program Manager

Mike joined Michigan Sea Grant in August 2021. As the research program manager, Mike leads Michigan Sea Grant’s statewide research efforts on critical Great Lakes issues, such as sustainable fisheries, healthy coastal ecosystems, and climate change adaptation.

Mike formerly served as an assistant research scientist at the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research, where he studied various issues in aquatic ecology, including harmful algal blooms, fisheries, and ecosystem responses to multiple stressors. He received his PhD in ecology and evolutionary biology from the University of Michigan in 2007. He has also held postdoctoral research positions at the University of Michigan, Oklahoma State University, and The Ohio State University.

Education

Ph.D. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, 2007

A.B. Biology with Specialization in Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago, 2001

Professional experience

Before joining Michigan Sea Grant, Mike held research scientist positions at the University of Michigan’s Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research and The Ohio State University. During this time, he collaborated on a variety of Great Lakes projects with scientists from universities, state and federal agencies, and non-governmental organizations.

Publications

Sinclair, J. S., M. E. Fraker, K. A. Frank, J. M. Hood, and S. A. Ludsin. in revision. Multiple stressors induce contrasting responses in the functional trait composition of fish assemblages in Lake Erie. (Global Change Biology)

Fraker, M. E., J. S. Sinclair, K. A. Frank, J. M. Hood, and S. A. Ludsin. in review. Contrasting states of the Lake Erie ecosystem: implications to ecosystem-based management. (Science of the Total Environment)

Fraker, M. E., S. C. Keitzer, J. S. Sinclair, N. R. Aloysius, D. A. Dippold, H. Yen, J. G. Arnold, P. Daggupati, M.-V. V. Johnson, J. F. Martin, D. M. Robertson, S. P. Sowa, M. J. White, and S. A. Ludsin. 2020. Projecting the effects of agricultural conservation practices on stream fish communities in a changing climate. Science of the Total Environment 747: 141112.

Dippold, D. A., N. Aloysius, S. C. Keitzer, H. Yen, J. G. Arnold, P. Daggupati, M. E. Fraker, J. Martin, D. M. Robertson, S. P. Sowa, M.-V. V. Johnson, M. J. White, and S. A. Ludsin. 2020. Forecasting the combined effects of anticipated climate change and agricultural conservation practices on fish recruitment dynamics in Lake Erie. Freshwater Biology 65: 1487-1508.

DeVanna Fussell, K. M., R. E. H. Smith, M. E. Fraker, and 17 co-authors. 2016. A perspective on needed research, modeling, and management approaches that can enhance Great Lakes fisheries management under changing ecosystem conditions. Journal of Great Lakes Research 42:742-753.

Brodnik, R.*, M. E. Fraker*, E. J. Anderson, L. Carreon-Martinez, K. M. DeVanna, B. J. Fryer, D. Heath, J. M. Reichert, and S. A. Ludsin. 2016. Combining microsatellite data with dispersal trajectories of larvae reveals novel stock structure and demographically-important population connectivity in a freshwater fish. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 73:416-426. *co-first authors

DuFour, M. R., C. J. May, E. F. Roseman, S. A. Ludsin, C. S. Vandergoot, J. J. Pritt, M. E. Fraker, J.J. Davis, J. T. Tyson, J. G. Miner, E. A. Marschall, and C. M. Mayer. 2015. Portfolio theory as a management tool to guide conservation and restoration of multi-stock fish populations. Ecosphere 6:art296.

Fraker, M. E., E. J. Anderson, K.-Y. Chen, J. J. Davis, K. M. DeVanna, M. R. DuFour, E. A. Marschall, C. J. May, C. M. Mayer, J. G. Miner, K. L. Pangle, J. J. Pritt, E. F. Roseman, J. T. Tyson, Y. Zhao, and S. A. Ludsin. 2015. Variation in larval advection and early life history of Lake Erie walleye (Sander vitreus): insights from an individual-based biophysical model. Journal of Great Lakes Research 41:830-845.

Fraker, M. E., E. J. Anderson, R. Brodnik, L. Carreon-Martinez, K. M. DeVanna, B. J. Fryer, D. Heath, J. M. Reichert, and S. A. Ludsin. 2014. Particle backtracking improves breeding subpopulation discrimination and natal-source identification in mixed populations. PLoS ONE 10:e0120752.

Michael Fraker

Michael Fraker

Research Program Manager

(734) 972-3071
mfraker@umich.edu

Michigan Sea Grant
520 E. Liberty St., Suite 310
Ann Arbor, MI 48104-2210